Announcements

Harwood International Dinner
On Thursday, March 16, join the students and families who are traveling to Greece and Italy in April 2017
More ...


WARNING: Annual Meeting of Harwood Union High School District NO. 19 on March 6, 2017
Annual Reports
Read More ...

Read More Announcements

Mission

"It is the mission of Harwood Union High School to provide an educational and creative environment in which every person is valued as an individual, challenged as a learner and inspired to contribute to a democratic society. As a professional learning organization of all academic departments, we are prepared to work together in order to provide a unique and personalized learning experience for all students."


@HarwoodAD

RT @JBiggam: John Kerrigan (l) & Tom Strasser brainstorming before the relay as Harwood girls Nordic trail Middlebury by 6 points https://t…
- Feb 24 2017 1:32 PM

@rexa_harwood

@allison_zmuda @CVULearns Student reflection & self assessment.
- Feb 21 2017 6:03 AM

English / Language Arts 

Suggested Course Sequence

10

11

12

Electives

  • Sophomore English 
  • Sophomore English Honors

 

 

 

  • American Studies – 2 credits
  • American Studies Honors - 2 credits

(Interdisciplinary History/English course)

  • AP English Literature & Composition
  • Media Studies

 

 

1/2 Credit

  •       Creative Writing
  •       Poetry

 

 

Please Note:  Sophomore and junior courses are usually taken in sequence. They may be taken concurrently with permission of the English department head. 


Sophomore English (24)    1 credit English

  • Prerequisite(s): Completion of Freshman English
  • Approved NCAA Course

Sophomore English focuses on the interpretation and evaluation of a variety of media and literary works. Students critique professional and peer writing regarding word choice, style, conventions, content and literary elements. Classroom discussions and students’ writing and presentation include the understanding of perspective, interpretation, details and elaboration. Research focuses on information gathering in a variety of ways and the creation of extensive annotated bibliography.

What will you Learn?

Students will read, comprehend, interpret, analyze and evaluate a wide range of text. Students will learn:

  • How to cite properly and understand the meaning of complex stories
  • To focus on central ideas of stories
  • How to analyze important ideas in stories
  • The meaning of words and figurative language
  • How to analyze an author’s choice of words and themes
  • Why an author writes about certain subjects
  • How authors persuade other
  • How to evaluate important information from different media

Students will produce clear and coherent writing for many different tasks, purposes, and audiences. Students will conduct short research projects and show an understanding of the subjects investigated. Students will also learn:

  • How best to write argumentative essays
  • How best to write narrative essays
  • How best to write a research paper

Students will learn how to have better command of English grammar, usage, and mechanics.

Students will learn:

  • How to apply new words in different contexts
  • The importance of choosing the best word/s to convey meaning
  • How to create figurative language

How will you be Assessed?

Formative Assessment: Class discussions, responses to reading, quizzes, and homework assignments. Summative Assessment: One formal essay per quarter, oral presentations, projects, vocabulary and grammar tests, mid-term and final exam.


Sophomore English Honors (26)    1 credit English

  • Prerequisite(s): Completion of Freshman Honors and/or recommendation of Freshman English teacher
  • Approved NCAA Course

Sophomore English Honors focuses on the interpretation and evaluation of a variety of media and literary works. Students critique professional and peer writing regarding word choice, style, conventions, content and literary elements. Classroom discussions and students’ writing and presentation include the understanding of perspective, interpretation, details and elaboration. Research focuses on information gathering in a variety of ways and the creation of extensive annotated bibliography. The pace set in this course in terms of reading and writing expectations is accelerated.   For learning goals and methods of assessments, see description of Sophomore English (24)



American Studies (333)    2 credits: 1 English and 1 US History credit

  • Prerequisite(s): Recommendation of 10th grade English and History teacher      
  • Approved NCAA Course

American Studies is a comprehensive survey of American history and literature. In the history section of American Studies, students will examine primary and secondary works of history to develop a clear historical narrative of the “American Experience.” In the English section, students will read classic works of American fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays. A key element of the English part of American Studies is that all literature will be studied in its historical context.

What will you Learn?

  • Historical events are experienced, recorded, and interpreted by individuals with different perspectives
  • A variety of forces, both human and non-human, interact to shape historical events
  • Human identity is influenced by a variety of factors
  • Individuals are able to make choices to change society

How will you be Assessed?

  • Class discussion, weekly journal entries, response to text, and homework assignments.
  • At least one formal essay per quarter; oral presentations; choice projects; mid-term and final project.

American Studies Honors (333A)    2 credits: 1 English and 1 US History

  • Prerequisite(s): Recommendation of 10th grade English and History teacher
  • Approved NCAA Course

This integrated humanities course is a comprehensive survey of American history and literature, from first contacts among peoples to modern political conflicts. Students will examine primary and secondary works of history alongside classic works of American fiction, nonfiction, poetry and plays. We will focus on Americans’ practical experiences and the visions of society they developed.  The pace set in this course is accelerated.

What will you Learn?  

  • Students will understand the world around them through questioning, analyzing information, and communicating their findings
  • To communicate in ways that foster the exchange of ideas in a democratic society.

How will you be Assessed?

  • Class discussion, five-minute writes, body polls, response to text writes, and homework assignments
  • 1 extended research paper, 2 choice projects from different units, a minimum of 3 proficient formal argumentative essays, 2 oral presentations, Civil Rights research project, 2 found poems, Constitution children’s book, mid-term and final exam (both exams project-based).  All summative assessments will be evaluated using rubrics.

Advanced Placement English Literature & Composition (50)    1 credit English

  • Prerequisite:  Senior status, and recommendation of American Studies teacher and completion of summer reading.

The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.

Students who take the AP English Literature & Composition course are strongly encouraged to take the exam.

What will you Learn?

  • To comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a wide range and level of complex literary and informational texts.  
  • To produce clear and coherent writing for a range of tasks, purposes and audiences. Conduct short and sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation
  • To demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

How will you be Assessed?

  • Class discussion, 5-minute writes, dialectical journal entries, response to text (including 40-minute AP essay prompts), multiple choice practice, and homework assignments
  • At least 1 formal essay each quarter, oral presentations, 40-minute essay prompts, mid-term and potentially a final exam, all evaluated using rubrics

Media Studies (44)    1 credit: 1 English credit or 1/2 Unified Art Credit and 1/2 English

  • Prerequisite(s): Senior status, or Juniors with instructor permission

From Plato to Picasso, from Shakespeare to Spielberg, great thinkers and artists skillfully combine images and words so we can make meaning in this world. Study topics you’re interested in and prepare to work with a variety of media, combining visual and language arts. This course is designed to be an active investigation into the human experience!

What will you Learn?

By combining visual and language arts and studying topics of interest, students will:

  • Create and publish digital stories in print and online
  • Conduct research projects to answer relevant questions
  • Learn how ethnography relates to digital storytelling

How will you be Assessed? (Learning Scales/Rubrics/Course Assessments)

  • Class discussion, weekly portfolio entries, responses to media, and homework assignments
  • Independent projects, oral presentations, public exhibits

Creative Writing (43)    1/2 credit English

  • Prerequisite(s): Sophomore, Junior or Senior status
  • Approved NCAA Course

Students will write fiction, creative nonfiction, drama, and prose poetry. Students will be asked to keep a writer’s journal, participate in writing workshops, prepare and polish pieces of writing, which are shared with the class.

What will you Learn?

Students will produce clear and coherent writing for many different tasks, purposes, and audiences. Students will also learn:

  • How best to write narrative pieces
  • How to have better command of grammar, usage, and mechanics
  • How to apply new words in different contexts
  • The importance of choosing the best words to convey meaning
  • How to create figurative language

How will you be Assessed?

Class discussions, writer’s journal, and reflections on reading and writing.

Polished drafts of various genres of writing


Poetry (45)    1/2 credit English

  • Prerequisite(s): Sophomore, Junior or Senior status
  • Approved NCAA Course

Poetry is a complicated art form; therefore, the course is designed to be a balance of studying masters of the craft and the creation of original poems by students.

What will you Learn?

Students will comprehend, interpret, analyze and evaluate a wide range of text. Students will learn:

  • To focus on central ideas of poems
  • How to analyze important ideas in poetry
  • The meaning of words and figurative language
  • How to analyze an author’s choice of words and themes
  • Why an author writes about certain subjects

Students will produce clear and coherent writing for many different tasks, purposes, and audiences.

In terms of the English language, students will learn how to have better command of grammar, usage, and mechanics.

How will you be Assessed?

  • Class discussions, poetry journal, and reflections on reading and writing.

  • Polished drafts of analytical essays and original poetry